Frequently Asked Questions

 

No, this is false. All three preservation areas within the Hoakalei Resort are zoned preservation and only the Honolulu City Council can change that. Haseko has NOT asked the City (or any other governmental agency) to eliminate any of the three designated preservation areas within our development. Haseko has had no discussions with anyone about converting any of the preserves into housing. Haseko has no intention of building homes in any of the preserves. All three of the designated preservation areas within our development will remain preservation areas.

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HRCA full build-out budget given to all purchasers discloses and assumes HRCA maintains all common amenities, including the lagoon.

Hoakalei Homeowners’ share is estimated to be 30% of the total HRCA budget. Homeowners currently pay $36/month to HRCA – and that amount has remained unchanged since the start of Hoakalei in 2008. Haseko estimates that the monthly HRCA fee will be about $50/month plus inflation at full-build-out.

Commercial/Resort members of HRCA will pay 70% of HRCA expenses. Commercial businesses will also pay for maintenance of the public pathway on their property that is NOT owned by HRCA.

To date, Hoakalei Homeowners have not paid anything towards maintenance of the lagoon, and will not pay anything until after the lagoon has been turned over to the HRCA.

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The HRCA fee paid by Hoakalei homeowners covers their proportionate share of the costs of maintaining all association-owned property (i.e. landscaping along major roadways, parks, etc).

HRCA fees also cover less visible items such as drainage structures, retaining walls, and insurance that only benefit Hoakalei residents as part of the community’s required infrastructure. In the future, once development is complete and ownership of the lagoon and other amenities are turned over to HRCA, the cost to maintain those will be included in the monthly HRCA fee.

The lagoon and related amenities that HRCA fees will cover in the future will benefit Hoakalei homeowners by attracting the resort/retail components that residents are understandably eager to see come to Hoakalei. Being a part of a dynamic community also can enhance property values for Hoakalei homeowners, and provide them with easier, more convenient access to all amenities since they live much closer to them than non-residents.

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No. Haseko currently is responsible for 100% of the costs to maintain the lagoon, the Wai Kai Hale Club and the remaining undeveloped land around the lagoon, and will remain responsible until development is complete and turned over to future resort/commercial owners and HRCA. The monthly fee Hoakalei homeowners currently pay to HRCA only applies to common areas already owned by HRCA.

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Yes. Haseko has retained the award-winning internationally-renown firms of Hart Howerton and CallisonRTKL to design a lifestyle center as the primary commercial entertainment/retail/dining area of Hoakalei. Haseko’s commercial brokerage team is actively marketing and pre-leasing the center.

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These areas are underdeveloped and may create hazardous conditions for residents. There is also large equipment and active construction on, adjacent to and around the roadway…sometimes after hours and on weekends as well. Haseko understands residents are eager to access this area and will provide opportunities as it can.

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Associations generally transition from a developer-controlled board in the early stages of a neighborhood/project to a homeowner-controlled board once the neighborhood/project is completed. Some condominium/townhome associations are 100% run by residents such as Ka Makana Townhomes Association and the Kipuka Association. This practice was also followed for the associations in Ocean Pointe.

The HRCA Board is currently comprised of developer seats and will eventually transition to a mix of homeowners and other classes of members such as resort and commercial when the project is completed.

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There will be no charge to utilize the public swimming area planned adjacent to the northwest corner of the lagoon. Aside from the public swimming area, the general public will be able to use the waters of the lagoon itself for watercraft recreation purposes by patronizing one of the future commercial vendors/resorts, or as a guest of a member of the Wai Kai Hale Club. These future commercial vendors/resorts will be helping to pay for the maintenance of the lagoon itself as part of their share of HRCA fees.

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No, the lagoon is not open to the general public. It is surrounded by an active construction site so access and use are restricted.

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The Wai Kai Hale Club is an association-based amenity for Hoakalei residents. When homeowners purchased in Kipuka, Kuapapa and Lei Pauku, they automatically became mandatory members of the Wai Kai Hale Club. Ka Makana Homeowners have an option to join. Currently in its initial phase, the Club offers a beach-like setting with chaise lounges and BBQ grills and private access to the Lagoon for launching small watercraft – all located on the northeast side of Lagoon. Members can participate in stand up yoga classes, monthly Pau Hana events and other social gatherings. A swimming pool and permanent restrooms are being planned and designed right now, and construction could begin next year. For more information about the Club, please visit www.facebook.com/WaiKaiHaleClub.

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The Master resort covenants Hoakalei homeowners received when they purchased their home describes the mechanism for determining homeowners’ share of HRCA fees. You can find this breakdown in Exhibit C, Table No. 1 of the master covenants. The table lists the different types of class members of HRCA and the assigned Minimum Equivalent Units per class. If you look at column D, you’ll see that the amount shown for Residential is at 30%, the golf course is at 2%, and the remaining Hotel/Industrial/Retail/Marina comprises the remaining 68%. With the proposed change from marina to lagoon, it is anticipated that some of the non-residential uses shown below will be simplified in a future update of the master covenants.

  • A. General Classification
  • B. Minimum Total Number of Assessable Separate Interests per General Classification
  • C. Equivalent Units Per Separate Interest
  • D. Total Minimum Equivalent Units Per General Classification
  • Residential
  • 2314
  • .500
  • 1157
  • Hotel
  • 950
  • 2.00
  • 1900
  • Golf
  • 74
  • 1.00
  • 74
  • Industrial
  • 30
  • 1.00
  • 30
  • Retail
  • 500
  • 1.00
  • 500
  • Marina
  • 600
  • .250
  • 150

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